Kenney Real Estate Group


Homeschooling has been a growing educational option in the last decade or so. The possibilities for homeschooling at all grade levels have significantly increased in recent years due to both demand and easy access to the internet. Although each state differs on the guidelines and requirements for students, homeschoolers have a lot of choices on how they get their educational requirements fulfilled. 

Independent Homeschooling

Traditional homeschooling usually constitutes that you provide not only all the curriculum but also the instruction and schedule. When you chose this method, you are considered completely independent. You will need to file minimal paperwork with the local school district. Check the state's requirement on what to submit and when. The cost of learning materials, electives, and field trips are up to you with this educational option. There is a lot of customization available in this way of schooling. Your student can progress through subjects that really spark their interest and take extra time when an area takes a bit more effort to understand. Record keeping and transcripts are your responsibility for each of your student(s). 

Public School Online 

Many school districts are offering online learning either through individual districts or state level. Your student is considered a public-school student and all learning materials are provided by the program. If your student(s) are enrolled with the local school district, there is usually one day a week of face to face interaction. You student will most likely check in with an advisor teacher and go over the weekly assignments be able to ask any questions and clarify the next tasks. There is also a chance to meet and interact with other online students. During these on-campus days, electives are offered to allow students to explore additional areas of study. If you choose the online option that is overseen at the state level, your student will then check in with an instructor via email, phone call or video chat at scheduled intervals or when your student requests assistance. Field trips are often offered by regions and provide for students to meet each other and learn together. 

More Choices the Better

No matter what options you choose the flexibility for today’s students are on the grow. Try to keep in mind your student’s learning style. One size does not fit even within a household so take your time and find what will work for your family environment and each individual student. Remember that whatever school district you live in also affords your student with organized sports that they can participate. 

So take some time and research what your local school district offers as far as off-campus learning, you may be surprised at the variety that is out there.


If this is your first home sale, you might be wondering about what your requirements are in terms of home inspections. A vital step in the closing process, professional home inspections are typically included in real estate contracts as a contingency (the sale is dependent upon their completion).

But, are there any situations in which a seller would get a home inspection?

In today’s post, we’re going to talk about why sellers might want to get their home inspection and how it could be useful to the home sale process overall.

To diagnose problems with your home

When you’re deciding on the asking price of your home, you’ll want to take into account all of the things that could potentially drive that price down. Inspectors will look for a number of issues in your home, which can save you from any surprises when a potential buyer orders their inspection of your home.

The further along in the home sale process when you discover an expensive repair that needs to be made, the more complicated it makes your home sale.

So, if you’re in any doubt about whether your home will need repairs now or in the near future, ordering an inspection could be a safe option.

What do inspectors look for?

When inspecting your home, a licensed professional will look at several things:

  • Exterior components of your home, such as cracks or broken seals on exterior surfaces, garage door function and safety, and so on.

  • The structural integrity of your home; checking your foundation for dangerous cracks where moisture can enter and cause damage in the form of mold or breaks in the foundation.

  • The roof of your home will be checked for things like broken or loose shingles or nearby tree branches that could damage your home or nearby power lines in a storm.

  • The HVAC system will be tested to make sure it’s running properly and efficiently and also that vents are clean and clear of debris.

  • Interior components of your home will be checked for safety and damage from things like pests and water damage.

Will the seller still order an inspection if my home just had one?

An inspection contingency is built into almost all real estate contracts to protect the interests of the buyer and seller alike.

In most circumstances, a buyer will want to get their own inspection performed. After all, they don’t know who you went to for an inspection and whether they were licensed in your state.

The bottom line

Ultimately, if you’re planning on selling your home in the near future and aren’t sure if your home may have any underlying issues, it’s usually a good idea to get an inspection to make sure you can plan for any repairs or inform potential buyers of any issues with your home.


After you buy a house, it may be only a few weeks before your closing date arrives. At this point, you and the home seller will finalize your transaction. And if everything goes according to plan, you'll own a new home.

Getting to closing day, however, sometimes can be difficult. Lucky for you, we're here to help ensure you can enjoy a quick, seamless home closing.

Now, let's take a look at three steps to close on a home.

1. Complete Your Mortgage Application

A mortgage is a must-have for a homebuyer to close on a residence. Fortunately, it often can be simple to obtain a mortgage that matches or exceeds your expectations.

Consult with several local banks and credit unions. By doing so, you can learn about all of your mortgage options and select a mortgage that corresponds to your finances.

After you complete a mortgage application, a bank or credit union can provide you with mortgage options. Then, you can make an informed decision about which mortgage suits you perfectly.

2. Perform a Home Inspection and Appraisal

A home inspection is paramount, as this assessment will enable you to identify any underlying home problems and address them before closing day arrives.

During a home inspection, a property expert will assess your residence both inside and out. This expert also will provide an inspection report that details his or her findings.

Review the results of a home inspection report closely – you'll be glad you did. If you assess a home inspection report, you can review a home inspector's findings and determine whether you still want to purchase a house.

If you accept the inspection results and decide to move forward with a home purchase, an appraisal may follow.

Like a home inspection, an appraisal requires a property expert to visit your home. This expert will evaluate your home's interior and exterior, as well as comparable houses in your city or town. Following a home appraisal, you will receive a property valuation.

Oftentimes, a property valuation may match or exceed the price that you intend to pay for a house. If it does not, there may be instances in which you can still walk away from a home sale or ask the seller to lower a house's asking price.

3. Buy Home Insurance

Home insurance safeguards your residence and personal belongings against loss, damage or destruction. As such, it is essential to purchase home insurance before you close on a house. Because with home insurance in place, you'll be good to go to protect your house and personal belongings against myriad disasters.

The closing process can be long and complicated. But if you work with a real estate agent, you can receive plenty of support leading up to closing day. In fact, this housing market professional is happy to provide tips to ensure you can streamline the closing process.

Get ready for closing day – follow the aforementioned steps, and you can speed up the process of acquiring your dream house.


While buying a home is an exciting time, many buyers actually regret their home purchase. One of the biggest regrets that people have is the size of the house they purchased. People either pick a home that’s too large or too small. It may be hard to imagine that you can make a mistake on the size of the home that your purchase. You go into the home buying process knowing how many bedrooms you need and what type of home you might like. Once you begin living in the house, you could find a different story. You may not have enough space for all of your family’s belongings. On the flip side, you could find the amount of space in your home as overwhelming. 

Buying a home isn’t like buying most other things. You can’t easily return it, and there’s quite a bit of an upfront investment that must be made in order to make the purchase. It’s not simple to make a change if you buy the wrong house. The wrong purchase could set you back in making a move for years to come. 

Shop Smart

The best thing to do when shopping for a home is not only to see the home in its current state but what type of potential the house has. Can you add on to the home? Would you be able to make use of all the space the home has? Is there enough storage in the house? Are there ways to quickly add storage? These are a lot of things to consider when shopping for a home but they’re all important questions. Once you move into the home, other than doing a complete overhaul, you may be out of options to improve it without looking for these areas. Of course, the ideal situation is to find a home that already has everything you’re looking for in it.      

Don’t Buy Until You’re Ready

Another mistake that people make is they try to go from renting to owning before they’re ready. Living in an apartment or rental allows for a bunch of advantages that owning a home may not afford you. Owning a home takes commitment, and some people just aren’t ready. Just because it’s widely known knowledge that buying a home is a smart financial decision, doesn’t mean it’s always the best decision for you. You may not be able to afford a house that’s the right size for your family. You may not even know what the right size home will be for you. When these questions remain, you could end up buying a property that’s the wrong size. Don’t worry if you need to take a few more years to save up for a house. On the contrary, don’t worry if you don’t think buying a home is the right decision for you at all.     




If you’re new to gardening, you may think you have a brown thumb just because your first few tries ended up in dried brown heaps. That might be because you picked more sensitive or temperamental plants without the experience necessary to baby them along. Instead, opt for some of the more natural plantings that are great for beginning gardeners and even children.

- Zinnias: These annuals grow only for one season, so you need to plant them every year, but their bright and colorful flowerheads are magnificent as potted flowers or in the garden. They also come in many shapes and sizes, so if you plant many different types together, you’ll constantly be surprised by the shape and color of the blooms.

- Sunflowers: These colorful blooms have large, easy to work with seeds that grow into large, happy blooms. If you grow the massive or mammoth varieties, they’ll grow extra-large heads and make great eating seeds (but save a few to plant for the next year).

- Snapdragons in yellows, pinks, and whites invite butterflies into your garden. They even survive tough spring and fall weather.

- Pansies can grow in very cold weather, making them the perfect plant to start indoors and set out on your porch to add some color even before all the snow has melted away. If mulched property, pansies overwinter in some regions meaning you don’t have to plant them again each year.

- Marigolds have cheerful yellow or yellow and orange blooms that bring warmth and a splash of brightness to any garden. They have the added bonus of scaring off pests and insects so your gardening won’t succumb to sure destructive flies and nematodes if you plant marigolds around the edges.

- Impatiens won’t make you impatient. Their pretty, delicate blooms in all shades of red, pink, lavender and white grow great in pots and in shady beds alike. You can even keep them as houseplants provided you continue to trim them when the blooms fade.

- Begonias are the perfect plant for hanging baskets and garden beds. Their lush greenery with bright flowers nestling in the folds adds a colorful splash to any porch or garden.

- Daffodils are early spring risers form their hardy bulbs. If you plant them in a sunny area of your garden, you’re sure to have bright yellow blooms to greet each spring. 

Consider planning seedlings (partially grown plants) rather than seeds if it is your first gardening experience or if you want to make sure you have the curb appeal you desire. If you’re a first-time gardener, join a gardening club or spend time with your local nursery professional so that you know which flowers to plant in your area for best results.




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